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Love: the sermon that everyone understands

CBM has a unique response to the food shortage crisis gripping parts of Africa

We live in interesting times. On one hand we’re experiencing unprecedented convenience – cars with cameras, TV on demand, unlimited internet.

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And on the other hand – our world is in turmoil. We’re living during a time of devastating crises. The scale of the famine in Africa is so large that the United Nations is calling it the worst humanitarian crisis since 1945. More than 20 million people are facing starvation and famine.

Imagine, almost the entire population of Australia facing starvation.

Across several African countries, drought has a choking grip on peoples’ lives and futures.

In many of these places, families rely on farming as a way of life. People farm their land to grow food for their family but also to sell produce to create income. Families use this money to pay for school fees, purchase equipment or farming supplies for their land, and importantly plan for the future.

But consecutive failed rainy seasons, combined with changing weather patterns, mean millions are facing failed crops and this results in no money to purchase what they need to survive.

Children in Ethiopia hold up water containers that they bring to school each day to ensure there will be enough water.

Children in Ethiopia hold up water containers that they bring to school each day to ensure there will be enough water. CBM

Look at the picture above. These children in Ethiopia are caught in the devastating famine. Their school has no water; so each student must bring three litres of water to ensure the school has enough for the day.

Sharing this reality isn’t meant to make you feel hopeless; it’s simply a real perspective into the experiences of people living through incredibly difficult times.

As you can imagine, aid and humanitarian agencies around the world are responding to this huge crisis.

But CBM’s response is unique. We look for those who are hidden or forgotten. People with disabilities. People just like Regina from Zimbabwe. Regina has a physical impairment that makes it difficult to walk long distances.

She, and her two children, were caught in a severe food crisis. Regina had relied on her farm to produce food for her family and to help with income. But after three years of drought, she was left with nothing.

Regina was forced to travel five kilometres to get water to use. It’s hard to put yourself in that situation – not being able to turn the tap on and have water run freely. Instead you have to pack up a bucket, travel five kilometres, fill your bucket up, and then travel back. Anytime you needed more water; day after day.

The good news is that we can be part of the solution.

Now, think of Regina, who must complete this long journey with her physical impairment. But CBM’s response is ready.

CBM is positioned, across Africa, to reach children most in danger – those with chronic hunger, disability, or from a family with a parent who has a disability. Our partners are busy providing survival support to meet people’s basic needs. Support which can include rice, cooking oil and medical screening.

CBM’s work is motivated by love. We are moved to action by the words of our founder, Ernst Christoffel, who dedicated his life to serve others.

He said, “The deed of love is the sermon that everyone can understand.”

It is this simple principle that drives us to reach out to those most vulnerable in times of emergency. While the situation is sobering and the facts hard to comprehend, the good news is that we can be part of the solution.

You can be part of CBM’s emergency response – your action can generate love, and give people who are living in desperate need the hope that they are not forgotten.

Be part of love in action and share the sermon that everyone understands.

Visit CBM for more information or call our team on 131 226.

Be part of love in action and share the sermon that everyone understands.

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