Leila Abdallah prayed in court as deadly driver sentenced to 28 years

Leila and Danny Abdallah lost three of their six children last year when Samuel William Davidson crashed his car into them, while speeding under the influence of alcohol and drugs.

Antony, 13, Angelina, 12, and Sienna Abdallah, 8, were all killed, as was their cousin Veronique Sakr, 11.

Today, the Abdallah and Sakr families were in Parramatta District Court to hear Davidson being sentenced to a maximum of 28 years in jail, with a 21-year non-parole period. He had pleaded guilty to all charges against him, including manslaughter.

AAP reported that before Davidson’s sentence was announced, Leila Abdallah knelt on a cross on the floor to pray. Outside the court, she said: “We hope people will learn from what happened with us, that drink driving, speeding and drugs can kill someone”.

After the verdict, Danny Abdallah told the media that his family believed Davidson’s sentence was “God’s will”. Widely known as the Christian family able to extend forgiveness to Davidson immediately after the death of their children, Danny said the Davidson family had also now lost a son.

He described the tragedy and Davidson’s sentence as a “lose-lose” situation.

“Our focus was never really about what serving a sentence was going to be,” News.com.au reported Danny Abdallah’s words after the verdict.

“We will all have our hearts broken until the day we take our last breath and no sentence can help ease that pain.” – Danny Abdallah

“When we made that choice of forgiveness we focused on our kids.

“We knew justice would be served and it was served because it was God’s will this sentence.”

“We will all have our hearts broken until the day we take our last breath and no sentence can help ease that pain.”

Judge James Bennett described Davidson’s action as “horrific” and that his “menacing” driving demonstrated he did not care about the safety of others.

“The manner of driving was such that tragedy was inevitable,” Judge Bennett said. “The magnitude of the tragedy extends to the unimaginable.”

Veronique Sakr’s mother, Bridget, said dangerous driving in Australia “needs to stop”.

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