Opinion  |  

Christchurch made me do something I have never done

Agnes Wilson wanted to put love into action. So she did

I heard the terrible news about the Christchurch mosque killings on Friday. By Saturday night, I found out that children were among the dead.

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I was appalled at what a senator from Queensland said in the wake of such tragedy. And utterly ashamed that he used Scripture to justify his comments.

I wanted my son to learn there are moments in life when we should act in love.

Most of all I was and am so very sorry for the pain his awful, disgusting words have caused people. His twisted world view does not belong in the Australian parliament. I believe it should not belong anywhere.

My heart goes out to the people of Christchurch, and the Muslim community who have been vilified for so long.

After Senator Anning’s comments, I did something I have never done before. I bought some flowers, waited for my son to finish Korean school and together we sought out a mosque in our local area.

I wanted my son to come with me because he was old enough to understand what had happened and I wanted him to learn there are moments in life when we should act in love.

I pray more brothers and sisters in Christ will choose to act with kindness; that their actions will reflect God’s love so profoundly displayed in Jesus.

There was no mosque near to where we live. Just a prayer room. We placed our flowers outside and I was heartened to see we were not the only people to have laid flowers there. Our little tribute seemed so inadequate. And I prayed it was received in the spirit in which it was given.

It can be a nasty, broken, sinful world, but I wanted the people who regularly took Friday prayers there to know they were our neighbours. That we loved them. Not just in word or speech, but in action.

I am sure the political slinging match between the Left and Right has already begun. But among the noise, I pray more brothers and sisters in Christ will choose to act with kindness; that their actions will reflect God’s love so profoundly displayed in Jesus.

Because it is love and bucket loads of forgiveness we need now.

Of all the stories of people who were gunned down that day, it is Daoud Nabi’s story that has stuck with me. He was a 71-year-old Afghan refugee. They say he was a compassionate man. They say he was a man who tried to help everyone.

His final words to the terrorist were “Hello, brother”.

Agnes Wilson works for a Christian NGO and attends Chatswood Presbyterian Church in Sydney

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